The Silence of the Good People

“The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people.”

– Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.


Throughout history, the destructive forces of oppression and abuse have been stoked by evil intentions, agendas and behavior. Yet, there is another source that can fuel insidious plans — the reliance on silence. Over the years, I have learned the value of silence for a specific reason — to listen closely to learn and grow. Keeping quiet for the purpose of being a student of others and situations is an admirable quality and discipline. But, the motivation to stay silent because of the consequences is a real fear gripping the hearts of many. Too often, our culture has exposed the destructive force of silence when it was necessary to speak up.

The fear to speak the truth in love and bring correction can be attributed by the addictive comfort of convenience. The convenience of not saying anything to avoid being the target of attacks, false accusations and slander certainly maintains the status quo. But, it can also lend itself to being complicit to a system, person or thought that only serves to cause greater pain. More than ever, our culture is facing some hard and inconvenient realities that must be addressed in an assertive manner. If not confronted head-on, it can serve to exacerbate conditions that are not helpful to anyone.


SEXUAL HARASSMENT & ABUSE


For example, the #MeToo and #TimesUp campaigns are a few movements have shed light to a long-standing problem of sexual harassment, abuse and exploitation. Every time we hear a report of a celebrity, leader or influencer being toppled by substantiated claims, you may hear a collective sigh of disappointment. But, you may also hear others voice (after the claim) a lack of surprise. Why is that? It may be due to their knowledge of the person’s behavior in years past and a refusal to address it for the sake of their career or to curry favor. With all due respect, this is part of the problem. As more people speak out and share their stories, we must be diligent in investigating what happened and ensure it doesn’t happen again. I’ve wondered how many more people have stories that they are afraid to share because of what they think will be the consequences. How many more people are living in daily fear? While easier said than done, we must support the victims and their courage to speak out on their behalf and for the sake of others. We can no longer be silent or be silenced. As Dr. King stated emphatically, “the silence of the good people is the ultimate tragedy.”


OUR POLITICAL CLIMATE


The same applies to our current politics. For years, political allegiances have caused those who are supportive of a candidate or leader who has said or done something inappropriate to remain silent or to defend the indefensible. In the 1990s, when President Bill Clinton acted inappropriately in the White House, too many supporters of the President defended him. You may have agreed with his policies, but it doesn’t mean you don’t have the right to speak directly to his lack of character. It also doesn’t mean you’re being hypocritical. When President Donald Trump reportedly called nations in Africa and Haiti, s**thole nations (Link to Story), such language from the leader of the free world has been universally viewed as unacceptable. Whether you agree with President Trump’s policies on immigration, the economy or his leadership of the nation, can we agree that such language will not make america great again? I’ve been dumbfounded by the silence of the good people and how anyone who values character and integrity can defend such remarks. The coarsening of our culture, the increased partisanship in our politics and the voluntary segregation of aligning with those who only agree with us, have led us to this moment. It is unfortunate to conclude that too many people will overlook clear infractions of dignity and respectability for the purpose of their agenda going forward.


SYSTEMIC INJUSTICES


Another area where silence has been destructive is the systemic injustices in the United States and our world. Whether it is the shooting of an unarmed person and its disproportionate amount in minority communities, the economic disparities amongst communities, gentrification, or even how American citizens are detained, incarcerated or addressed in our prisons, the silence is deafening. At times, the silence is due to not having enough information to address the matter. For those reading this blog, I encourage you to seek out reputable resources that can help in the study of these issues. The silence of the good people may also be due to the conflation of our opinions to facts. As the late NY Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan was once quoted saying,

You are entitled to your own opinion, but you are not entitled to your own facts.” 

In a culture that is peppered with the phrases “fake news” or “alternative facts”, we must be even more diligent in searching out the facts of an issue and debate the best course of action for the betterment of society. We shouldn’t dismiss debate, but we must reject the deliberate effort to intentionally mislead.


WHAT CAN WE DO?


I’m encouraged by those who are speaking out about injustices and inequality for the purpose of resolution and healing. There will always be voices serving the agenda of division. But, as we reflect on the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., these voices are muffled by the collective voices of justice, healing, racial reconciliation and peace. It could be dismissed as naiveté, but I truly believe in the best of our humanity and civic discourse. The silence of the good people has reached a breaking point. Will we speak up on behalf of the defenseless, the helpless and the unprotected? And when we speak, will we add value to the national conversation? Join forces with a non-profit organization addressing societal injustices daily. Use your platform to address matters of concern and let your voice be heard. Call your local, regional and national legislators to voice your concerns. Make your voice heard in the voting booth. Hold your leaders to account for what they do or don’t do — what they say or don’t say. Collectively, let’s make sure when we speak, we have the courage of our convictions to follow through and backup what we say. In the words of Dr. King, “We must live together as brothers or perish together as fools.” – RF


ABOUT AUTHOR

Ryan E. Faison is the College and Young Adults Pastor at Christ Church in Montclair & Rockaway, NJ and the Executive Director of Young Adults United. Ryan also serves on the Clergy Advisory Board for HomeCorp in Montclair and the Nyack Alliance Theological Seminary Alumni Association. Ryan serves as a preacher, worship leader, and producer at Christ Church. Ryan has been married to Kristyn (an educator and worship leader) for 7 years and lives in Northern NJ. Connect with Ryan online at @RyanFaison (FB, Twitter, IG, Snapchat, Periscope).

Unwrap The Wonder (The Christmas Blog Post)

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” – Isaiah 9:6

During this Christmas season, I’m reminded of the difficulties and hardships many people and families are enduring. Whether it is the lost of a loved one, losing a job, a broken relationship or even an unmet need of any kind, Christmas can be a reminder of what is lost. In response to this reality, the Bible provides an answer that can lift our broken spirits and heal our wounds: choose hope. Hope is not wishful thinking that something may happen. Hope is anchored in the reality that unto to us, God’s Son was given to be our remedy for a broken humanity. It’s a wonder to behold how God sent His Son through Mary’s womb to save the world. In unwrapping this wonder, we see what God has truly given.

WONDERFUL COUNSELOR

This season may represent a deluge of decisions you need to make that affect your life. The encouraging word of Scripture in Isaiah reminds us that the gift of Jesus is wrapped as a wonderful counselor. This gift offers wisdom for everyday life that’s beyond our intellect, series of experiences or even our abilities. He counsels the nations but is intimate enough to counsel you through every trial, challenge and opportunity. This gift is waiting to be unwrapped in your life to affect change in our homes, communities, our region and yes, our nation and world.

MIGHTY GOD

The gift of Jesus is not only wrapped in intimacy but wrapped in power. Throughout the Word of God, Jesus is not only described as a gentle Savior but a mighty God who intercedes for us and shows Himself strong in our lives. I’m reminded of Psalm 147:5 where it declares:

“Great is our Lord and mighty in power; his understanding has no limit.”

We may wrestle with doubt, wondering if God will demonstrate the fullness of His power in our lives. Does He have the power to change this situation? Does He have the power to turn things around in my favor? Does He have the power to heal this broken heart? While these questions are fair to ask, the answer is not hard to come by. The Scriptures affirm He has the power. It’s our responsibility to seize it through prayer, devotion and seeking His face. Let’s unwrap the gift of our Mighty God who has the power to do all things but fail.

EVERLASTING FATHER

Unwrapping the gift of embracing the gift of our Everlasting Father may be difficult for you. Maybe your only reference to fatherhood was the absence of your father or the lack of relationship with one. This Christmas season, I return once again to the Scriptures that remind me that God is the blueprint of what fatherhood looks like. I can come boldly before the throne of grace and receive mercy (Hebrews 4:16). I can call on my Everlasting God, assured that He will answer me (Psalm 17:6). He may not answer me the way that I want Him too, but He will answer like the loving Father He is, knowing what’s best for me. If you’ve had a hard time embracing God as Father, allow this season of giving remind you that our Heavenly Father’s character is shown through the life of Jesus who cares deeply for you and will never leave you.

PRINCE OF PEACE

In a world riddled with violence and uprising, we can stand on the truth of Jesus being the Prince of Peace. For years, I wrestled with this title because I defined peace in the way the world does: a peace that’s either temporary or in flux but not reliable. Peace agreements have been settled and broken. Peace treaties have been trashed for the march to war and war profiteering. It can become disillusioning to see “the peace” the world offers. But, Jesus said this:

“Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. Not as the world gives do I give to you.” – John 14:27

The kind of peace Christ offers is beyond our understanding but has the ability to guard our hearts and minds (Philippians 4:6). When you’re distressed, overwhelmed or filled with anxious thoughts, ask God in prayer for the Prince of Peace to enter your heart, occupy your space and take full control. While Scripture never promises the ceasing of our troubles in this life, we can respond in such a manner that reflects the peace that only God can give.

This Christmas, let’s unwrap the wonder of God’s amazing gift to the world and to every generation: Jesus Christ. I encourage you to prayerfully declare God’s Word and gift over your life. Join us at Christ Church as we celebrate Jesus at “Christmas Unwrapped” at our East Campus in Montclair, NJ (December 6-8 at 8 PM) and at our West Campus in Rockaway, NJ (December 14 & 15 at 8 PM). For more information, go to www.ChristChurchUSA.org. – RF


The Value of Empathy

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Empathy is a rare commodity, but needed more than ever.

Recently, a story has been circulating newsrooms across the country. The family of Sgt. La David T. Johnson, one of four soldiers killed in an ambush in Niger, felt disrespected when President Donald Trump said to the grieving widow that the soldier “knew what he signed up for.” (Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/18/us/politics/trump-widow-johnson-call.html) Whether you take this exchange as valid or believe it is “fake news”, the sentiments reportedly expressed raises questions about how we value empathy in today’s culture and society.

According to Merriam-Webster, the definition of empathy is:

the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and experience of another of either the past or present without having the feelings, thoughts, and experience fully communicated in an objectively explicit manner. (Source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/empathy)

You may not have experienced a specific tragedy or disappointment. You may not have endured another’s pain. Yet, when you value empathy, you can extend compassion and connect deeply to their experience. Too often, the value of empathy is being dismissed and replaced with a callousness and apathy that permeates every sector of society. If you are attempting to start a new business and fail during your first try, rather than being greeted with words of compassion or being coached, you may be on the receiving end of words such as “You should have prepared more” or “Your business plan was weak” or “You needed to do more research before making the leap”. Apathy’s default is always what you could have done better and how you are a victim of your own weakness and lack of preparedness. It never considers circumstances out of your control, unexpected roadblocks or the emotional roller coaster endured to reach a particular goal.

The lack of empathy doesn’t end in the business arena, but extends in relationships, employment, and other areas of life. If you’re relationship or friendship failed, you don’t have what it takes. If you still are unemployed, you didn’t look hard enough. If you’re in need of assistance, you’re lazy. If you are having a hard time loosing the weight, you’re undisciplined. See the pattern? Apathy immediately resorts to what is wrong with you or what’s missing. Empathy relates to your pain, demonstrates compassion and serves to journey with you to healing and wholeness. Your pain may have been a result of wrong decisions. Your condition may have been a consequence of your poor planning. But, when you are bleeding, you need to address the wound with tender love and care. If I’m bleeding, I simply don’t need good thoughts my way or feeling sorry for me (pity or sympathy). I need sympathy with a compassionate response. I need empathy.

Whether you are in a leadership role or serving others, we all can grow in valuing empathy for our fellow man and woman. When I review the Scriptures, I see a man by the name of Jesus who spoke truth but in love. I witnessed a man who showed compassion, coupled with correction. I see a man who took time to tackle the problem and not the person. We can all learn from Jesus’ example. And if you find yourself having difficulty showing empathy to others, I would suggest you ask yourself this question: “How would I like to be treated?” – RF

Prayer & Support for the Gulf Coast (Links)

The devastating flooding taking place in Houston, Texas and the surrounding region as a result of Hurricane Harvey has a direct affect on the lives of millions. As an American family and a global society, we can pray for those affected and the brave men and women in their rescue and recovery efforts. We can also support the cause financially through the following means:

American Red Cross

Salvation Army

Samaritan’s Purse

You can also donate blood at the American Red Cross or find other reputable charities through Charity Navigator.

To the people of Houston, Texas and the surrounding Gulf Coast Region: we are with you. – RF

Going Deeper

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You may hear this often from churchgoers, viewers of Christian TV or those who attend regional Christian conferences:

“I need more ‘meat’!”

“Now that’s a deep Word!”

“So good! So good!”


“I NEED MORE MEAT AUDIENCE”

Depending on the source, these phrases could have a different meaning. Oftentimes, the “I need more meat” audiences are referring to the Scripture passage in 1 Corinthians when the Apostle Paul was addressing the Corinthian church and said:

“And I, brethren, could not speak to you as to spiritual people but as to carnal, as to babes in Christ. I fed you with milk and not with solid food; for until now you were not able to receive it, and even now you are still not able; for you are still carnal. For where there are envy, strife, and divisions among you, are you not carnal and behaving like mere men?” (1 Corinthians 3:1-3 NKJV)

In this Scripture, the word “milk” means the basic, elementary teachings of Christianity that are studied by new believers. The “meat” or “solid food” refers to the deeper, spiritual doctrines. In essence, “I need more meat” audience desire deeper insights into spiritual doctrines of the Gospel.


“NOW THAT’S A DEEP WORD” OR “SO GOOD” AUDIENCE

The “Now That’s A Deep Word” or “So Good” audience often respond in recognition that what’s being communicated draws from a deeper well than what is written on the page. For many, when they hear something new or another way of looking at a Scripture, they may find themselves responding immediately with either phrase. This audience serves to affirm the speaker or preacher that they have “done their homework” and provided a fresh take on an ageless passage of Scripture.


GOING DEEPER QUESTION

If you are in need of “more meat” or you find yourself affirming with a “so good”, does it mean that you have made the deliberate choice to go deeper? In my Christian walk, I have found that going deeper is not limited to having more information about the Bible. It’s not limited to have a revelation of God’s Word that was hidden to you before. I offer to you that is requires this and more. Here’s my equation:

INFORMATION + REVELATION + APPLICATION = GOING DEEPER

A basic understanding of God’s Word opens up the opportunity to receive revelation about the text, the author of the Eternal Word and the one (you) reading it. But information and revelation are not enough. I’ve had to ask myself this question in my own relationship before God:

If it’s “so good” then why aren’t these truths being demonstrated in your life? Where is the application?

When the Word of God is not only given an Amen in words but in lifestyle and choices, you will discover that going deeper is not a cliché. It is a conviction. If I want to know the Creator of my soul, the author of my faith and the strength of my life, I make the deliberate, intentional choice daily to go deeper. Studying to learn, praying to understanding, surrendering my will to apply God’s will for my life.


PRAYERFEST: FRIDAY, JULY 28, 2017

My church, Christ Church, will be hosting a regional prayer gathering called Prayerfest 2017: Making History Through Prayer. Our church family is currently on a 40-Day Prayer Journey to go deeper in God (access the guide here). I want to encourage you to join us on this journey and meet us at Prayerfest on Friday, July 28th at 9 AM (Christ Church West Campus, 140 Green Pond Road, Rockaway, NJ – http://www.Prayerfest.net). Let’s go deeper in God together! – RF

Holy Week REFlections: Easter Sunday, April 16, 2017

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JESUS IS ALIVE!

Love compelled Jesus to the cross. Love rose Jesus from the dead. Love leads Jesus to intercede for us right now. On this Easter Sunday, the Savior of the World invites you in loving relationship with Him.

To give thanks to Jesus for His love, enjoy this song by Anthony Evans:

Holy Week REFlections: Holy Saturday, April 15, 2017

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“It was now about noon, and darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon, for the sun stopped shining. And the curtain of the temple was torn in two. Jesus called out with a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” When he had said this, he breathed his last. The centurion, seeing what had happened, praised God and said, “Surely this was a righteous man.” – Luke 23:44-47

 

Surely, this was a righteous man.

Surely, this is a righteous man.

Surely, He is the Righteous One.

 

The death of Jesus on the cross was no ordinary event. It marked the exact time when the debt of our sins, that could not be paid by man alone, were paid in full. The blood of Jesus satisfied our debt and granted us access to the Father. When we pray, we pray in the name of Jesus because His life granted us the authority to boldly approach the throne of grace.

But for the enemies of Jesus, this was the end. No more need of a rousing prophet and preacher who said He was the Son of God. Yet, his actual death sparked reactions that were surprising and alarming. In Luke 23, we see that the event was so impactful, even doubters and skeptics said the word SURELY. In death, Jesus revealed His divinity for those who wanted to see. While the enemies of Christ and the Father of Lies surely celebrated the final breath of Jesus on this side of eternity, these same enemies forgot who they were dealing with.

As we think of the day of crucifixion and the day of resurrection, it’s the 2nd day in between that may stir up doubt, skepticism, worry and fear. Did Jesus really mean what He said? This question among others may taunt us today. Before a breakthrough, we wonder if it will come. Before the miracle, we question if God will show up right on time. Before the blessing, we may get weary in our belief that Jesus will be what He said He would be. Is He the One who can redeem, restore, and set free?

I can assure you, backed by the authority of Scripture, Jesus is the One.

Sunday is coming…

Surely…

Sunday is coming.

Holy Week REFlections: Good Friday, April 14, 2017

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“Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends.” – John 15:13

Love is best defined through sacrifice. When we witness a couple exchange vows on their wedding day, seasoned married couples know full well that this moment is a promise of commitment and love. These vows are tested by the challenges and opportunities that life presents. It’s the sacrifices by each spouse from day to day that leads to the success of a marriage. While words and verbal declarations are important, the fulfillment of those words through action carries even greater weight.

Jesus personified love through His sacrifice on the Cross. This sacrificial act of love was not under compulsion, but under obedience to the Father. Jesus prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane:

“Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” – Luke 22:42

This Scripture passage demonstrates that Jesus preferred another route to save the world from sin and eternal damnation. This “cup” was a hefty price to pay. “God made him who had no sin to be sin for us, so that in Him we might become the righteousness of God” (2 Corinthians 5:21). This sacrifice on the Cross of Calvary was a risky proposition. Jesus committed to die on a cross for a people that may ultimately reject Him. Yet, the promise of each member of humanity to become the righteousness of God (in right standing with the Father) was worth the risk. The reward was a people reconciled back to God.

On this Good Friday, we are reminded of the great sacrifice of the Father. He surrendered His one and only begotten Son for the sins of the world. This day, we remember the sacrifice of Jesus, who surrendered to the brutality leading to and at the cross. Jesus took the ultimate risk for the reward of relationship with you.

I know Whitney Houston was sang of “The Greatest Love of All”. No greater love was personified than Jesus laying down His life for His friends.

On this Good Friday, we are reminded that death died so that we may have life and life more abundantly.

What will you respond to the greatest love of all? 

Holy Week REFlections: Holy Thursday, April 13, 2017

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For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” – Luke 19:10

 

The King of Kings and the Lord of Lords. (Revelation 19:16)

The Savior of the World. (1 John 4:14)

The Alpha and The Omega. (Revelation 22:13)

 

When you reflect on the titles given to Jesus, any position or title we’ve ever had or will have pales in comparison. It’s not everyday that you hear someone called The Savior of the World. The reason for that is because there is only one. While Jesus walked on the earth, He could have carried these titles like a badge of honor, esteeming Himself and demonstrating His great power for recognition. But the Savior didn’t do that. The King didn’t choose that route. He humbled Himself as a servant.

 

Jesus’ greatest service was to obey the will of the Father. This led Him to seek and save the lost. For there were many that didn’t even know they were lost or needed saving. I was in that place too. I attended church and understood religious terminology. I acknowledged and accepted the Lord as my Savior at the young age of 13. I was practically raised in the church. But, I soon discovered that Jesus was looking for more. Rather than merely attending church, He wanted me to be the church. He was still chasing me down. He wanted a relationship beyond the surface. He was seeking me out.

 

Whether you are in a place of searching to discover the truth of Scripture or have embraced the Word of God as the final authority in your life, Jesus is still on a mission of seeking you. For God is not through with ministering to your soul, shaping your character and directing you into purpose. This chase and this pursuit led Jesus to the rugged cross on Calvary. As you read this right now, He is seeking you out. His love for you compelled Him to surrender His very life on behalf of yours.

 

Let Jesus find you in a place of surrender. If you do, you’ll discover you have much in common with the One who surrendered everything for you.

 

Today’s Prayer


Lord, I recognize there have been times I have subtly or directly pulled away from Your Presence. I may have even rejected Your love thinking I was not worthy to receive it. Yet, Your pursuit of me and of others proves that You count us worthy. I position myself today to surrender to Your heart and Your will for my life. I count it a privilege to journey with you on this adventure called life. In Jesus Name, I pray. Amen.

Holy Week REFlections: Wednesday, April 12, 2017

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“Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple.” – Luke 14:27

Whenever I receive an invitation to a wedding, I’m reminded of how much thought went into choosing the guest list. Each invitation comes at a cost: the reception venue, food, entertainment and the price of hosting family and friends. For a couple to think of me as a worthy guest to their most special day is an honor. While I enjoy the festivities, I’m acutely aware that someone paid for my plate!

 

Like a wedding guest list, Jesus invites us in relationship. But, this is no ordinary relationship. Jesus (self-described most as the Son of Man) invites our humanity to connect with His divinity. While the invitation is extended, He doesn’t demand your acceptance. His desire is that you will come to embrace the call to follow Him. But, He offers a disclaimer. If you want to be a true Christ-follower, it will require a bearing of your own cross.

 

In essence, Jesus invites us into cross training! If we are going to give our lives over to Christ, there’s a price. There’s a cost. And anytime a cost is involved, you can expect a thinning out of the crowds. Everyone is not ready or willing to pay the price of following Christ. But, the Word encourages us to see the great benefits of doing just that!

 

While salvation is open to everyone who will come in faith, discipleship is another thing altogether; it’s cross training! It’s a death to self. It’s identifying with the shame and pain of our Suffering Christ on the cross. It’s counting the cost of aligning your will to His. When we count the cost of following Christ, we also can expect to count the blessings of serving Him.

 

Today’s Prayer


Lord, words cannot begin to describe the joy of being in relationship with You! Grant me the courage and boldness to take up my own cross to follow You. And when I am weak and weary, remind me that You give strength in my weakness to do the very thing You’ve called me to do. In Your Name, Jesus, I pray. Amen.